Cliff Hague

Cliff is a freelance consultant, researcher, author and trainer. He is the Chair of the Cockburn Association.

He is Professor Emeritus of Planning and Spatial Development at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.

He is a Past President of the Royal Town Planning Institute, and of the Commonwealth Association of Planners.

He is a past Chair of Built Environment Forum Scotland.

He was awarded the O.B.E. in the 2016 Birthday Honours.

Books

Some articles fromall categories:

Cities of tomorrow – towers or tents?

Youth camp participants discussing Cities of Tomorrow Young people from Germany, Norway, Latvia, Poland, Russia and Scotland attended last week’s international youth summer school in Benmore, Scotland. The event was put on by Planning Aid for Scotland and by Innovation Circle. The theme was “Cities of Tomorrow”. I was asked to lead the introductory session. I started with…

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Ravages of Hurricane Sandy – Planning for disasters

Hurricane Sandy was the largest tropical storm ever recorded in the Atlantic, covering an area 900 miles across, with 150km per hour winds bringing torrential rain. We have all been stunned by the impact that it has had on the Eastern Seaboard of the USA. Without in any way belittling this, it is important to…

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India launches Smart Cities competition

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi this week launched his government’s response to the urbanisation challenges it faces. The Smart Cities initiative was announced alongside a „Housing for All by 2022“ programme. The aim is to create new Smart Cities while also regenerating old urban areas and addressing sustainability issues. The 100 Smart Cities will be…

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Luanda: The transformation of an African city

I recently visited Luanda, Angola’s capital, to deliver workshops on sustainable development and urban planning. I was able to gain a first hand experience of the dramatic and controversial changes in the city. At something over 5 million people, Luanda is now one of Africa’s major metropolitan areas. While every city follows its own historical…

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Rural to urban migration in a different culture

Happy New Year – the Chinese Year of the Dragon! Every Chinese New Year 130 million people in the world’s most populous country head back home to their villages for family celebrations. It is the world’s largest human migration and the story is captured in the film “Last Train Home”. It focuses on one family…

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Smart cities is a strong theme in the World Urban Forum

The exhibition at the Ninth World Urban Forum highlights the Asian embrace of Smart Cities. This is my fourth World Urban Forum, and, as ever, the exhibition is worth visiting. Most of the booths are taken by national governments, some by cities or local government organisations, a few by research institutes or by campaigning NGOs.…

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How to save town centres

In smaller towns across the UK and many other countries, the town centres are struggling. Julian Dobson, has a barrowful of ideas of what to do about it. His book How to Save Our Town Centres is the best starting point I know for those who want to combine analysis with action. It is well researched, well-informed and…

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Amsterdam and AESOP 1987 (Part 2)

Local history and a trip to a Planning Committee meeting. The second part of my Diary as published in Planning on 11 December 1987. To read the first part of this article, please click here. The article is reproduced by kind permission of the editor of Planning. To seem more of my old columns in Planning, please go to the…

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Community and film: Akenfield and Byker

Three contrasting films prompt important questions about the nature of communities, past and present, rural and urban. The word „community“ is often invoked by planners and architects, but all too often with disregard for the realities. This week I have been to see three films that explore what communities are and how they function, while also…

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