Cliff Hague

Cliff is a freelance consultant, researcher, author and trainer. He is the Chair of the Cockburn Association.

He is Professor Emeritus of Planning and Spatial Development at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.

He is a Past President of the Royal Town Planning Institute, and of the Commonwealth Association of Planners.

He is a past Chair of Built Environment Forum Scotland.

He was awarded the O.B.E. in the 2016 Birthday Honours.

Books

Some articles fromall categories:

Stornoway

Stornoway  http://www.befs.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/SMALL-TOWNS-Stornoway-Report.pdf  29 June 2013

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Free on-line learning on cities and planning

The Erasmus University in Rotterdam provides a series of on-line trianing materials on urban development and planning, with a particular focus on rapidly urbanising countries. How to mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change in African cities?  How to finance urban infrastructure? What is Local Economic Development and how can it be delivered?…

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What development strategy for Europe’s neighbourhood?

What kind of regional development actions might boost competitiveness and growth through forging new links with states around the borders of the European Union (EU)? This is the question that will be the focus of a meeting in Cyprus that I am participating in this week. The EU’s European Neighbourhood Policy dates from 2004. Its objective is to avoid…

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„This project will be a good one!“

Young Eyes is a new IC project. It looks to me like it will be a good one. I was at the kick-off meeting in a cold and misty Warsaw in January. All the partners were there – Jelgava and Rauna from Latvia, our Polish friends from Suwalki, and from the far north came the…

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Western Balkans Realities

In the early 1990s Yugoslavia began to disintegrate, triggering a series of vicious wars as ethnic groups contested territories. I have been doing some work looking at current development in the countries of the Western Balkans. Although conditions have certainly improved over the past decade, and the World Bank now rates them as “upper middle…

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