Cliff Hague

Cliff is a freelance consultant, researcher, author and trainer. He is the Chair of the Cockburn Association.

He is Professor Emeritus of Planning and Spatial Development at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.

He is a Past President of the Royal Town Planning Institute, and of the Commonwealth Association of Planners.

He is a past Chair of Built Environment Forum Scotland.

He was awarded the O.B.E. in the 2016 Birthday Honours.

Books

Some articles fromall categories:

Parks, Heritage and the Future of Cities: my talks next week

A busy week ahead. I have a number of online events coming up, which may be of interest to followers of this website. On Friday morning, 19 June, I am speaking in the Institute of Historic Building Conservation Virtual School.  The theme of this event is Old Towns: New Futures – Heritage Reflections and Speculations from a Global…

Read more

Afghanistan’s urban population to double in 15 years

Around 8 million live in Afghanistan’s cities today, but that number is expected to double by 2030.Yet, like many other rapidly urbanising countries, it has no national urban policy, no housing policy, and local planning is weak. The country remains predominantly rural, with only 1 in 4 living in urban areas. However, a recent report by…

Read more

WUF10 – Disasters waiting to happen

This is my third daily blog from the 10th World Urban Forum. Today has not been a disaster! Far from it, there have been some really good stories to hear at the World Urban Forum. But I want to put the theme of disasters at the heart of this blog. In yesterday’s blog I mentioned the World…

Read more

Community and film: Akenfield and Byker

Three contrasting films prompt important questions about the nature of communities, past and present, rural and urban. The word „community“ is often invoked by planners and architects, but all too often with disregard for the realities. This week I have been to see three films that explore what communities are and how they function, while also…

Read more

Can innovation save town centres?

Town centres are dying. The economic crisis has highlighted the malaise. There are empty shops, as people head to the edge of town supermarket. Internet shopping replaces the trip to the store downtown. Prominent buildings once used for public functions such as town halls, post offices or churches stand empty too, as services have been…

Read more