Cliff Hague

Cliff is a freelance consultant, researcher, author and trainer. He is the Chair of the Cockburn Association.

He is Professor Emeritus of Planning and Spatial Development at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.

He is a Past President of the Royal Town Planning Institute, and of the Commonwealth Association of Planners.

He is a past Chair of Built Environment Forum Scotland.

He was awarded the O.B.E. in the 2016 Birthday Honours.

Books

Some articles fromall categories:

New Zealand’s planning system faces change

New Zealand’s right-wing minority government is amending the legislation that defines the planning system, to address what it calls problems with „cumbersome planning processes“. The Minister, Dr Nick Smith called it „a moderate reform Bill that will reduce the cost and delays for homeowners and businesses“. He introduced the Bill to amend the Resource Management…

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A Tale of Two Cities: Fellini’s Roma and Davies’ Liverpool

Like many planners I am a fan of the movies, and especially fascinated by films where place is central to the narrative. Over the weekend I was lucky enough to see not one, but two films about cities. They have a lot of similarities but also many differences. They areFellini’s Roma and Terence Davies’ reflections on…

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ESPON and the EU’s Territorial Agenda

This blog was first posted on the Planning Resource website on 22 June 2011. Budapest What can local and regional authorities do to speed economic recovery? What kind of actions are needed to make the pattern of development more sustainable? How can we make places more inclusive?  The Territorial Agenda of the European Union 2020 (TA), agreed…

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Planning on the West Bank

I am writing this blog from East Jerusalem. I have been invited over here by theUN-Habitat team based in Ramallah on the Israeli Occupied West Bank of the Jordan. The purpose of the visit is to learn about how planning is practised here, and what might be down to make it a more equitable, fair and…

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UK Launch of „Leading Change“ book

A conference at the University of Birmingham on 22 March on „Planning Challenges in the Commonwealth“ will be the venue for the UK launch of the book „Leading Change“ My latest book, „Leading Change: Delivering the New Urban Agenda through Urban and Territorial Planning“ will have its UK launch at the conference „Think Planning –…

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2021 Awards for Planning in the Commonwealth

Calling all planners in the Commonwealth! The 2021 Awards for Outstanding Planning Achievement in the Commonwealth are now open for entries. The deadline for submissions is 24.00 British Summer Time on 9 August. There are 6 categories: 1. Planning for the climate emergency; 2. Planning for cities and human settlements / plan-making; 3. Planning for…

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Might territorial cohesion be the answer to the UK’s constitutional crisis following the Scottish Referendum?

Posted September 22, 2014 by cliffhague & filed Share The last week here in UK has been dominated by the referendum on Scottish independence. Although the “No” side won by a clear margin (55/45%) the issues behind the referendum have not disappeared, and now there is a political discussion at Westminster about devolution across the UK. Meanwhile, last Wednesday I…

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Grid-based plans for urban extensions

A simple grid plan for urban extensions should be the basis for managing rapid urbanisation says a new UN-Habitat report. The value of a grid as an organising structure for new development is demonstrated through historic and contemporary examples from different continents. UN-Habitat’s report concludes that „The main virtue of the grid is its simplicity; the rational…

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Community and film: Akenfield and Byker

Three contrasting films prompt important questions about the nature of communities, past and present, rural and urban. The word „community“ is often invoked by planners and architects, but all too often with disregard for the realities. This week I have been to see three films that explore what communities are and how they function, while also…

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New Delhi – a public health disaster

Almost half of the children in New Delhi are suffering irreversible lung damage because of the toxic levels of air pollution in the city. A number of factors make children particularly vulnerable to air pollution. They have lower immunity than adults and their respirtory tracts are easier for pollutnants to penetrate. Also particulate matter is concentrated…

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