Cliff Hague

Cliff is a freelance consultant, researcher, author and trainer. He is the Chair of the Cockburn Association.

He is Professor Emeritus of Planning and Spatial Development at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.

He is a Past President of the Royal Town Planning Institute, and of the Commonwealth Association of Planners.

He is a past Chair of Built Environment Forum Scotland.

He was awarded the O.B.E. in the 2016 Birthday Honours.

Books

Some articles fromall categories:

Long-established Planning course to close

The closure of one of the oldest undergraduate Planning courses in the UK has been announced. The BSc (Hons) in Town Planning at Heriot-Watt University, one of the oldest undergraduate Planning courses in the UK, has ceased to recruit new students. The course had been under pressure for some time over concerns about recruitment. To…

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Plaudits and Problems: Planning in the Commonwealth

This blog was first posted on the Planning Resource website on 21 February 2011. It was great to see the Commonwealth Association of Planners given the President’s Special Award at the RTPI Awards ceremony in London recently. Retiring RTPI President Ann Skippers emphasised the work CAP does in supporting planners across the Commonwealth. She invited the audience to imagine…

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Afghanistan celebrates World Town Planning Day

World Town Planning Day (8 November) was celebrated in Kabul by a national urban conference addressed by the President. Minister for Urban Development, Sadat Naderi,  highlighted the Urban National Priority Programme as Afghanistan’s new framework for urban sustainability and planning according international planning standards, building upon the country’s first ever ‘State of Afghan Cities 2015 Report’,…

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1972: The End of an Era?

This blog was first posted on the Planning Resource website on 24 April 2012. This week Planning magazine celebrates its 40th birthday. At this critical juncture, the point where mid-life crisis is supposed to kick in with a vengeance, I thought that I should look back to where I was in 1972, while still taking…

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Luanda: The transformation of an African city

I recently visited Luanda, Angola’s capital, to deliver workshops on sustainable development and urban planning. I was able to gain a first hand experience of the dramatic and controversial changes in the city. At something over 5 million people, Luanda is now one of Africa’s major metropolitan areas. While every city follows its own historical…

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Cities for people to invest in – or to live in?

We are building cities to attract investment, not cities for people to live in, argued David Harvey, the distinguished geographer, speaking in Montevideo. Harvey argued that in times of economic crisis, one escape strategy has been to invest in the built environment, as a way to create opportunities for capital and to get potentially rebellious…

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New ESPON programme kicks off with focus on refugee migration

The ESPON programme gets going again with a seminar in Luxembourg in December focusing on refugee migration. As border fences are being erected once more in Europe, ESPON – the European Observatory Network on Territorial Cohesion and Development – will hold a seminar on 8-9 December in cooperation with Luxembourg’s EU presidency on the theme…

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Why the CV19 pandemic is a planning issue

The global pandemic raises some important questions about the links between public health and planning. With whole countries shut down and a soaring death toll,  there are signs that it will not be long before a debate about the trade offs between health and economies becomes heated. At the moment, the professional body in the…

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Dr. Keith Thomas – An appreciation

The death was recently announced of Dr. Keith Thomas who for many years taught students of planning at Oxford Brookes University. The death was recently announced of Dr. Keith Thomas who for many years taught students of planning at Oxford Brookes University. Before moving to Oxford in the mid-1970s, Keith was a Senior Lecturer in…

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