Cliff Hague

Cliff is a freelance consultant, researcher, author and trainer. He is the Chair of the Cockburn Association.

He is Professor Emeritus of Planning and Spatial Development at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.

He is a Past President of the Royal Town Planning Institute, and of the Commonwealth Association of Planners.

He is a past Chair of Built Environment Forum Scotland.

He was awarded the O.B.E. in the 2016 Birthday Honours.

Books

Some articles fromall categories:

Resilience of cities in the Global South

Resilience of cities is the theme of the latest issue of the French publication of Villes en Développement edited by my old friend Marcel Belliot. As the preface notes, resilience is now central to „approaches and strategies of governments partnering urban development and of funders.“ It brings a holistic and interdisciplinary approach to understanding and managing urban development.…

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Stornoway

Stornoway  http://www.befs.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/SMALL-TOWNS-Stornoway-Report.pdf  29 June 2013

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Planning for Growth – Innovation

This blog was first posted on the Planning Resource website on 28 September 2011. There is a clear message that comes from the modern literature about competitiveness. In a knowledge economy, competitiveness is closely tied to innovation. However, innovation is not a linear process from men in white coats in laboratories through to a commercially…

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Participative Planning post-Covid: Lessons from Scotland’s charettes

Dr.Michael Kordas provides insights into the use of charettes for participation in planning – before and after Covid 19. Dr. Michael Kordas provides this guest blog that raises important questions about how the changes forced by the Covid 19 pandemic might impact on participatory methods like charettes. My doctoral research investigated the impact of the…

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BREXIT – A blow to the European planning community

Klaus Kunzmann, distinguished professor of spatial planning at the Technical University of Dortmund, give his reaction to Brexit and ponders what it means for planning and planners. England (though not Scotland) has voted for Brexit. It will take months until those who voted against Europe will realize that they have made a tremendous mistake. They…

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Ghana’s Urban Forum to focus on spatial planning

Ghana’s fifth National Urban Forum was convened on 25 August to reflect on the theme “Building Resilient Cities: Deepening Spatial Planning and Land Value Capture for Development in Ghana.” Previous meetings of the Forum have contributed to the Ghana Urban Policy and its Action Plan to improve city conditions.  The Ghana Urban Agenda has been accepted at…

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Community and film: Akenfield and Byker

Three contrasting films prompt important questions about the nature of communities, past and present, rural and urban. The word „community“ is often invoked by planners and architects, but all too often with disregard for the realities. This week I have been to see three films that explore what communities are and how they function, while also…

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A Sense of Place – new futures for Public Markets

Ideas for reviving flagging public markets as places to shop, eat and meet were presented by experts at an international conference in Barcelona this week. With many public markets struggling to adapt to changing patterns of shopping the need for design and innovation has never been stronger, and the answer lies in creating a sense…

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Why civic trust is draining away

Civic pride and civic trust are important for community cohesion and well-being, but are being eroded by austerity and a centralised system of planning and local government. This was a central theme of the  inaugural Scottish Civic Trust Annual Lecture which I delivered in Edinburgh on 2 March. Scotland’s 5.2 million people are served by…

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